Tooth Extractions

We like to recognize the emotional attachment all of us have to our teeth by saying “ we are connected to our teeth in more ways than just physical.”  Sometimes, however, the heath or structural integrity of the tooth or surrounding bone dictates that in order to regain health, the tooth must be removed. You and the doctors may determine that you need a tooth extraction for any number of reasons. Some teeth are extracted because they are severely decayed; others may have advanced periodontal disease, or have broken in a way that cannot be repaired. Other teeth may need removal because they are poorly positioned in the mouth (such as impacted teeth), or in preparation for orthodontic treatment.

In many cases, a bone graft to decrease the deficit left by the removal of the tooth is advised for potential implant placement or a more structurally sound bone and support.

Facts for Consideration

An extraction involves removing one or more teeth. Depending on their condition, this may require sectioning the teeth or trimming the gum or bone tissue.

Once the tooth is extracted, you will have a space that you may want to fill with a fixed or removable appliance. Replacement of teeth may be necessary to prevent the drifting of adjacent or opposing teeth to maintain function, or for cosmetic reasons. These options will be explained to you in as much detail as you desire.

After Tooth Extraction

After tooth extraction, it’s important for a blood clot to form to stop the bleeding and begin the healing process. That’s why we ask you to bite on a gauze pad for 30-45 minutes after the appointment. If the bleeding or oozing still persists, place another gauze pad and bite firmly for another 30 minutes. You may have to do this several times whether a bone graft is placed or not.

After the blood clot forms, it is important not to disturb or dislodge the clot as it aids healing. Do not rinse vigorously, suck on straws, smoke, drink alcohol or brush teeth next to the extraction site for 72 hours. These activities will dislodge or dissolve the clot and retard the healing process. Limit vigorous exercise for the next 24 hours as this will increase blood pressure and may cause more bleeding from the extraction site.

After the tooth is extracted you may feel some pain and experience some swelling.  An ice pack or an unopened bag of frozen peas or corn applied to the area will keep swelling to a minimum.  Take pain medications as prescribed.  The swelling usually subsides after 48 hours.

Use the pain medication as directed. Call Dr. Blake Scott, Dr. Lindsey Scott and Dr. John Feaster if the medication doesn’t seem to be working. If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time, even if signs and symptoms of infection are gone. Drink plenty of fluid and eat nutritious soft food on the day of the extraction. You can eat normally as soon as you are comfortable.

It is important to resume your normal dental routine after 24 hours. This should include brushing and flossing your teeth at least once a day. This will speed healing and help keep your mouth fresh and clean.

After a few days you will feel fine and can resume your normal activities. If you have heavy bleeding, severe pain, continued swelling for 2-3 days, or a reaction to the medication, call Drs. Blake Scott, Lindsey Scott or John Feaster immediately at Fresno Office Phone Number 559-222-5331 .

The removal of a single tooth can lead to problems related to your chewing ability, problems with your jaw joint, and shifting teeth, which can have a major impact on your dental health.

To avoid these complications, in most cases, Drs. Blake Scott, Lindsey Scott and John Feaster will discuss alternatives to extractions as well as replacement of the extracted tooth.

After Care

Bleeding
Some bleeding may occur. Placing a piece of moist gauze over the empty tooth socket and biting down firmly for 45 minutes can control this.

Blood clots that form in the empty socket.
This is an important part of the healing process and you must be careful not to dislodge the clot.

  • Avoid rinsing or spitting for 24 hours after the extraction.
  • Avoid use of a straw, smoking or hot liquids.

Swelling
If swelling occurs you can place ice on your face for 10 minutes and off for 20 minutes. Repeat this cycle as you feel necessary for up to 24 hours.

Pain and Medications
If you experience pain you might use non-prescription pain relief medications, but Drs. Blake Scott, Lindsey Scott and John Feaster will discuss this with you on an individual basis.  Rest assured that we will take the best care of you throughout the process, as with all procedures.

Eating
For most extractions just make sure you do your chewing away from the extraction site. Stay away from hot liquids and alcoholic beverages for 24 hours.

A liquid diet may be recommended for 24 hours.

Brushing and Cleaning
After the extraction avoid brushing the teeth near the extraction site for one day. After that you can resume gentle cleaning. Avoid commercial mouth rinses, as they tend to irritate the site.

Beginning 24 hours after the extraction you can rinse with saltwater (1/2 teaspoon in a cup of water) after meals and before bed.

Dry Socket
Dry socket is when a blood clot fails to form in the socket where the tooth has been extracted or the clot has been dislodged and the healing is significantly delayed.

Following the post extraction instructions will reduce the chances of developing dry socket. Dry sockets manifest themselves as a dull throbbing pain, which doesn’t appear until three to four days after the extraction.  The pain can be moderate to severe and radiate from the extraction area. Dry socket may cause a bad taste or bad breath and the extraction site appears dry.

Drs. Blake Scott, Lindsey Scott and John Feaster will apply a medicated dressing to the dry socket to soothe the pain.

Healing
After a tooth has been extracted there will be a resulting hole in your jawbone where the tooth was.  In time, this will smooth and fill in with bone. This process can take many weeks or months. However after 1- 2 weeks you should no longer notice any inconvenience.

Replacing teeth with: